greek-museums:

Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki / Panagia Chalkeon:

Panagian Chalkeon belongs to a group of churches erected during the rule of the Macedonian dynasty of emperors (867-1057 A.D). It was built in 1028. The church is devoted to the Virgin Mary of the bronze workers.

apt987:

Juan Gabriel Posada

apt987:

Juan Gabriel Posada

apt987:

Juan Gabriel Posada

apt987:

Juan Gabriel Posada

lionofchaeronea:

Aeneas and Achates on the Libyan Coast, Dosso Dossi, ca. 1520

lionofchaeronea:

Aeneas and Achates on the Libyan Coast, Dosso Dossi, ca. 1520

jellobiafrasays:

soldier’s pay (1951 ed.)

I read this for a class in 2002. It’s decent.

jellobiafrasays:

soldier’s pay (1951 ed.)

I read this for a class in 2002. It’s decent.

"Ecstasy. From the Greek ekstasis. Meaning not what you think. Meaning not euphoria or sexual climax or even happiness. Meaning literally: a state of displacement, of being driven out of one’s senses."

Jeffrey Eugenides (via hierarchia, entelechies) (via hotelsongs) (via okayophelia) (via neverfeedthesarcophagi) (via corakeegans) (via c-aesarion) (via classicsenthusiast)

kardiologn:

Temple of Hatshepsut - Luxor, Egypt. Emily & Michael Dziedzic.

kardiologn:

Temple of Hatshepsut - Luxor, Egypt. Emily & Michael Dziedzic.

hyperallergic:

(via Striking Mosaic Floor Found in Greek Tomb)
 Last month, archeologists uncovered two oversize marble caryatids and a colorful marble panel in a substantial tomb complex in Amphipolis, Greece. Now, after excavating behind the sealing wall that the caryatids were guarding, they’ve found a chamber with a large and largely intact mosaic floor.
READ MORE

hyperallergic:

(via Striking Mosaic Floor Found in Greek Tomb)


Last month, archeologists uncovered two oversize marble caryatids and a colorful marble panel in a substantial tomb complex in Amphipolis, Greece. Now, after excavating behind the sealing wall that the caryatids were guarding, they’ve found a chamber with a large and largely intact mosaic floor.

READ MORE

knowledgeistreasure:

The Nok Civilization.

"…The Nok Culture civilization was discovered in 1928. The first discoveries was  accidentally unearthed at a level of 24 feet in an alluvial tin mine in the vicinity of the village of Nok in Jaba Local Government  in the southern part of Kaduna state,   near the Jos Plateau region which lies in the  central part of Nigeria in west Africa .  As a result of natural erosion and deposition, Nok terracottas were scattered at various depths throughout the Sahel grasslands, causing difficulty in the dating and classification of the mysterious artifacts.

Luckily, two archaeological sites, Samun Dukiya and Taruga, were found containing Nok art that had remained unmoved. Radiocarbon and thermo-luminescence tests narrowed the sculptures’ age down to between 2000 and 2500 years ago, making them some of the oldest in West Africa.

Because of the similarities between the two sites, archaeologist Graham Connah believes that “Nok artwork represents a style that was adopted by a range of iron-using farming societies of varying cultures, disputing the claim of solely being the diagnostic feature of Nok people.It is however a statement of fact that ,the Nok Terracotta fugurines  earned it’s name due to the Nok civilization that  inhabited the area from around 500 BC in the  village of Nok in Jaba Local Government  in the southern part of Kaduna state,  which lies in the  central part of Nigeria in west Africa . The Nok culture was considered to be the earliest sub-Saharan producer of life-sized Terracotta. The refinement of this culture is attested to by the image of a Nok dignitary figurine. Most parts of the terracotta is preserved in the form of scattered fragments. That is why Nok art is well known today only for the heads, both male and female, whose hairstyles are particularly detailed and refined. The statues are in fragments because the discoveries are usually made from alluvial mud, in terrain made by the erosion of water. The terracotta statues found there are hidden, rolled, polished, and broken. Rarely are works of great size conserved intact making them highly valued on the international art market. The terracotta figures are hollow, coil built, nearly life sized human heads and bodies that are depicted with highly stylized features, abundant jewellery, and varied postures….” http://nokculture.com/

(via fishstickmonkey)

un-monde-de-papier:

Coupole de Sainte-Sophie, à Istanbul.
Photo: cc http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Eusebius http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

un-monde-de-papier:

Coupole de Sainte-Sophie, à Istanbul.

Photo: cc http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Eusebius http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

(via massarrah)